Friday, 21 November 2008

progress

Well...

Have met with another Doctor who had come across with a differnt perpective, i am on a monitor at the moment looking at my bllod sugars for the next 3 days, then looks like i will be going on the pump.. which means no more injetions.. and should help keep my sugars down.. and if they are down it helps with the pain.. so cant be bad...

ohh but having an endoscope next week .. you know the one where they stick a metal tube thinf down your throat!!! grrrrreat!!
taking asmaple thinga s well for celiac disease?? but he talked about my pain killers nd stuff as well and is open to change on that as well which is good news... so fingers crossed maybe a brighter future ahead after all

until next time xx

Monday, 20 October 2008

My Dad

 
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Friday, 5 September 2008

My daily issues

wanted to write on here what i go thorugh on a daily basis, somwtimes i wish it was a visible disease, but then again if it were it would be the worst kind of disfigurment imaginable!

1. Feel sick every day , more do after i eat, kinda like haveing a hangover everyday
2. Painful feet like having a bruise on teh sole of your feet but x100,
3. pain in the side of my cheek like having an electric shcok every time i eat
$. increased heart rate, missing a beat.. hard to explain but the only way to beat it is to sit it out or lay down
4. hypos if your diabetic youy know,
5. gastrophroisis, constiptated, and diahorria hard to think about having both but it happens, not nice

These are just NORMAL every day issues i have to deal with

oh and then theres my head!!!! how would you cope!!

Sunday, 24 August 2008

wheelchair

Well.....

Imade the decison to purchase a wheelchair to help me get out n about more, the pain in my feet was getting too much to walk about for any length of time, so now rather than being out for an hour and feeling grumpy and in pain, i now can stay out for a couple of hours and be ok for the evening as well, i suppose it was more of a pride thing than anything else but once you get over that then it aint to bad, i suppose its about weighing it all up and it has helped so what the hell!!

i also had a call from a consultant in sheffield about my gastrophrosis and they are trialing a drug so i shall be putting myself down for that amd will let you know..

love n farts

me

Thursday, 17 July 2008

Deal with the pain!

Can you manage your mind to deal with the pain.... there are investigations that show pain can be "shut" off using your brain. I am believer in this.. so what is the trick and how do you do it.. well i have made it my mission to give you a daily diary of what i have done to deal with it.... yes i will be your guinea pig!! if you have and ideas let me know...

;)

Friday, 6 June 2008

Awful dreadful nightmare ...........

What a night.... sweating hot and cold... aching muscles... terrible back pain.... toilet issues.. and so tired!!!... just when you think its getting better it comes and bites you in the ass!!!

my feet have been giving me a lot of shite recently as well very painful and hard to walk on..i am doing well with my diet.. keeping away from stodgy stuff and lower carbs.....

still trial and error really.....

have reduced my nightly dose of glargin so i am have less hypos in the morning.. thank god.. not nice way to start the day.....

Thursday, 22 May 2008

Hi

I have just drawn up a leaflet to try and get some more awareness of the site and diabetes in general so if you are on here because of the door drop then thankyou for taking a look

Wednesday, 14 May 2008

nuclear test!!!

Had to go to the nuclear test lab in selly oak hospital the other day.. sounded bloody scary lol... but basically its all about my stomach.. as you know i have issues with it so i had to eat so egg with some chemical in it.. and some toast and orange juice.. then had like an xray done every 30 mins!!! for about 3 hours!! felt a bit sick n dizzy to start but was ok.....


i dont mind the tests if they are going to help me out.... but not for doing its sake.. if you know what i mean

AT LAST!!!!!!

well i have finally met with a doctor/professor that actually knows about NEUROPATHY... granted i had go to sheffield to see him but it was worth it.. none of this ummmm ahhh.. you know like what the builder does when he comes to do a quote!!

he understood what it was all about.. i am going for a few tests for half a day and he also wants me up there for a week.. so loads of proding and poking ... oh i have missed that!!!

Prof Soloman Tesfaye is his name look him up on the net.....

Tuesday, 22 April 2008

My diet

i have been looking into how i can help the sickness i feel after most meals and it looks like low fibre meals is the way forward so i am looking into what i can get..... i dont want to be fed by a tube....!!!!!! no very attractive!!

Sunday, 13 April 2008

DRUGS good or bad

is it good to take so many drugs!! i mean what are the real side effects!! short term ok,,, long term nit so sure!!

will it end!!

DO YOU THINK I WILL GET ANY BETTER AND BE ABLE TO LIVE A SORT OF NORMAL LIFE!!!


ANSWERS ON A POSTCARD!!!

will it end!!

DO YOU THINK I WILL GET ANY BETTER AND BE ABLE TO LIVE A SORT OF NORMAL LIFE!!!

ANSWERS ON A POSTCARD!!!

Appointment muck up

had an appoinment to test my guts!! see how it is going on in my intestines and stuff but they sent out the wrong letter, didnt state that i had to not take tramadol 24 hours before and fast the night before!! so not only was i feling pants that i had to go in a car to get there but i now have to come back which screwed me up for the day.. felt sick all day as i travelled in too short a space of time!! so re booked to have the test in a couple of weeks...

see how it goes but it will tell me what i already know ehich is that i have issues with the digestive system.. hopefully hey will be able to help me outy with it by giving me some sort of drug.... nit nice wanting to throw up evry day or after a short car ride!!

oh joy of joys!!1

Thursday, 13 March 2008

march rant

i flipped!!

Yesterday everything got on top of me.. frustrated with it all ... pains sickness sadness!!!! so iwent out side and started smashing the walking frame i nicked from hospital !!! and it felt great.. shouting and screaming .. the neighbours must have thought i was loopy!!! dad came out all frlustered sayong what was going on but i had to tell him to go away and it werent to do with them it was me and i needed to vent my anger!!!

Mom is fantasic though she knows me so well what to say when to say and when to listem.. she is AMAZING!!!!

We are lookign for a punch bag for outside for me... rocky watch out lol

but i tell u it fekt great!!!!!1

Monday, 25 February 2008

sick

Evening all,

Got a call from my doc today he wants to see me on wednesday morning for4 some tests, so i gotta fast the night before, i have had a few bad day recently... feeling sick alot.. knowing that when i eat that i am going to feel sick after is not a pleasent thought, but i suppose you gotta eat.. this dont help really when i want to put weight on but not being able to eat alot.. not really able to have the drinks the dietican gaver me as they make me feel sick... i dunno if its not one thing its another ...

Friday, 22 February 2008

reply from kerry

Hi Lee,It's Kerry here, we've swapped a couple of emails recently!I've been through your whole blog - I can relate to everything you've mentioned, from the pain in the legs and feet, being unable to take a bath because it feels like acid on your legs, to the tingly pain in the glands in the side of your mouth!!!Please hang in there, things will improve. Although I've just had a transplant, my neuropathy did improve to a certain extent through time and strict glucose control. It's not easy, you get fed up with the pain, discomfort and the imposition of the intrusive treatments, but you CAN make some improvement. It sounds like your glucose is doing a similar thing to mine! Gastroparisis mucks up your absorbtion, so you can't really predict what effect the carb/ sugars will have on your levels. It's to do with erratic stomach emptying, apparently! Have you had a stomach emptying test yet? It's not very pleasant, involves eating scrambled egg on toast and drinking milk laced with radioactive ions!! Not what you fancy when you're suffering with Gastro! Then you have to sit on a scanning machine, in the same position for at least a couple of hours!! But, you do get an idea of how well your Pyloric Sphincter (valve at the bottom of the stomach) is working. Mine ws pretty useless, so they gave me Pyloric Botox. Worth asking about, I believe that it helped me. They inject Botox into your Pyloric Sphincter, using an endoscopy procedure, so it may not involve a hospital stay, it can be done as a day case. Botox has the opposite effect on the Pyloric Sphincter, than it does on the faces of paranoid women!! It causes the valve to relax and therefore allows food to be digested more consistently and quicker than before treatment, relieving bloatedness and feelings of fullness, nausea etc. Might be worth a go, it has no adverse effects and if it doessn't work it just gets absorbed by the body. It's not permament and wears off after a few months, but it can help your body to heal, leaving you in a better place after treatment, than before!oh yeah, before I forget, a drug, similar to Amitrptyline, called Duloxotine (I think that's the right spelling!) Has been found effective for controling neuropathic pain. I couldn't take it because of the nightmares and hallucinations!! But if you can take Amitriptyline, Duloxotine shouldn't be a problem! Sorry I've gone on a bit! I'm so glad to have found another autonomic neuropathy sufferer. I thought you might be interested to hear that my friend Jane, who also suffered from Autonomic Neuropathy, died recently from her diabetic neuropthy. She also had 'Diabulimia', but never got over it, she continues to withold insulin etc right up until her death. She was only 23 years old. This condition is serious, people die, why isn't there more awareness???Anyway, I'd better leave it at that!!!!Take care of yourself and hang in there!!!Kerryxxx
February 6, 2008 2:59 PM

Monday, 18 February 2008

My Story

I was diagnosed with type 1 Diabetes and Autonomic Neuropathy in 2007...

Thursday, 14 February 2008

Cut down on carbs

Went to the docs and they have increased my blood pressure tablet to x3 a day instead of 1, but i have to go back and check my eyes as the drug has affects on your eyes. whoppi......... not feeling to great got a bit of a cold.. not feeling to bad stomach wise .. i had my toilet day last week week so i am waiting for that yet.. but i have cut down on the carbs which has seemed to have helped... and i am feeling less bloated.. rice seems to be o atthe mo.. so will see how it goes..

Monday, 4 February 2008

Increase traffic to your site

How do you increase traffic to your site

Podcast!!

DJ diabetic lee...... i have discovered a way of creating a podcast... i have looked around and the market seems to be dominated by the americans.. and i do want to simplify it.. kinda like this but on a podcast.. well will see how it goes and of course i will let you know,,,,

I am doing a website

well to be honest its the same as this but just in a different format...

here be the link

http://diabetes-neuropathy.magix.net/website/

Sunday, 3 February 2008

Pregnancy and diabetes

i have recently meet/spoken to a few people who have had gestational diabetes... quite common now which i did not realise so if you are reading this and what to know a little more then read below......

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes


Finding out you have gestational diabetes can be very frightening. Not only do you have to deal with all the emotions (the ups and the downs) and the questions that come with being pregnant, but also the uncertainty of this new-found condition. Fortunately, as with all types of diabetes, there are many well-informed health professionals to help answer your questions and to guide you through this very important time in your life. The more you know, the easier it is to accept and make the necessary changes for a successful and happy pregnancy. Let’s first review how you got here.
Somewhere between 24 and 28 weeks into your pregnancy your doctor most likely sent you to be screened for the presence of gestational diabetes. (If you were at greater risk for getting gestational diabetes, your doctor may have sent you earlier, at 16 weeks.) You may think this is too late in your pregnancy to be finding out about such a problem, but in most cases, screening before this time would be of little value. It is the hormonal changes (hormones made by the placenta that resist insulin) in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, along with the growth demands of the fetus, that increase a pregnant woman's insulin needs by two to three times that of normal.
Insulin is needed to take the sugar from your blood and move it into your cells for energy. If your body cannot make this amount of insulin, sugar from the foods you eat will stay in your blood stream and cause high blood sugars. This is gestational diabetes.
Gestational diabetes means diabetes mellitus (high blood sugar) first found during pregnancy. It occurs in three to five percent of all pregnancies (in other words, one in 20 pregnant women will develop gestational diabetes); so, you can take comfort in the fact that you are not alone.
In most cases, gestational diabetes is managed by diet and exercise and goes away after the baby is born. Very few women with gestational diabetes require insulin to control this type of diabetes. If you do need insulin, it will ensure blood glucose stays in the acceptable range, thereby reducing the risks to you and your baby.
Gestational diabetes should not be taken lightly. Immediate risks to the mom and the fetus are very real; however, these risks can be minimized with good care and follow up.
Ante-natal Care
Ante-natal care should be hospital-based, from a multi-disciplinary team
Individualise insulin regimens and recommend 4-times daily glucose monitoring.
Aim to maintain glucose 4-7 mmol/L and HbA1c within the normal non-diabetic range.
Remember insulin requirements increase progressively from the 2nd trimester until the last month of gestation, when a slight fall-off may be noted
Hypoglycaemia and loss of awareness is common in early pregnancy. Hypoglycaemia does not appear to have long-term adverse effects on fetal development
Ketoacidosis can cause fetal death at any stage. All women should test urine for ketones if blood glucose is high, if vomiting occurs or if they are unwell.
Delivery
The timing of delivery is individualised; in women with good diabetes control and no complications, the pregnancy may be continued to 39-40 weeks.
Caesarian section rates are often higher than in non-diabetic women.
Post-natal Care
Insulin requirements fall dramatically after delivery, therefore reduce insulin doses.immediately to pre-pregnancy levels, to avoid hypoglycaemia.
Encourage slightly higher blood glucose levels than during pregnancy.
In breast-feeding mothers, reduce insulin dose further once lactation is established.
Discuss contraception while the patient is still in hospital.
All women should be seen by the diabetes pregnancy care team six weeks after delivery.
More Information

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Finding out you have gestational diabetes can be very frightening. Not only do you have to deal with all the emotions (the ups and the downs) and the questions that come with being pregnant, but also the uncertainty of this new-found condition. Fortunately, as with all types of diabetes, there are many well-informed health professionals to help answer your questions and to guide you through this very important time in your life. The more you know, the easier it is to accept and make the necessary changes for a successful and happy pregnancy. Let’s first review how you got here.
Somewhere between 24 and 28 weeks into your pregnancy your doctor most likely sent you to be screened for the presence of gestational diabetes. (If you were at greater risk for getting gestational diabetes, your doctor may have sent you earlier, at 16 weeks.) You may think this is too late in your pregnancy to be finding out about such a problem, but in most cases, screening before this time would be of little value. It is the hormonal changes (hormones made by the placenta that resist insulin) in the second and third trimesters of pregnancy, along with the growth demands of the fetus, that increase a pregnant woman's insulin needs by two to three times that of normal.
Insulin is needed to take the sugar from your blood and move it into your cells for energy. If your body cannot make this amount of insulin, sugar from the foods you eat will stay in your blood stream and cause high blood sugars. This is gestational diabetes.
Gestational diabetes means diabetes mellitus (high blood sugar) first found during pregnancy. It occurs in three to five percent of all pregnancies (in other words, one in 20 pregnant women will develop gestational diabetes); so, you can take comfort in the fact that you are not alone.
In most cases, gestational diabetes is managed by diet and exercise and goes away after the baby is born. Very few women with gestational diabetes require insulin to control this type of diabetes. If you do need insulin, it will ensure blood glucose stays in the acceptable range, thereby reducing the risks to you and your baby.
Gestational diabetes should not be taken lightly. Immediate risks to the mom and the fetus are very real; however, these risks can be minimized with good care and follow up.
Ante-natal Care
Ante-natal care should be hospital-based, from a multi-disciplinary team
Individualise insulin regimens and recommend 4-times daily glucose monitoring.
Aim to maintain glucose 4-7 mmol/L and HbA1c within the normal non-diabetic range.
Remember insulin requirements increase progressively from the 2nd trimester until the last month of gestation, when a slight fall-off may be noted
Hypoglycaemia and loss of awareness is common in early pregnancy. Hypoglycaemia does not appear to have long-term adverse effects on fetal development
Ketoacidosis can cause fetal death at any stage. All women should test urine for ketones if blood glucose is high, if vomiting occurs or if they are unwell.
Delivery
The timing of delivery is individualised; in women with good diabetes control and no complications, the pregnancy may be continued to 39-40 weeks.
Caesarian section rates are often higher than in non-diabetic women.
Post-natal Care
Insulin requirements fall dramatically after delivery, therefore reduce insulin doses.immediately to pre-pregnancy levels, to avoid hypoglycaemia.
Encourage slightly higher blood glucose levels than during pregnancy.
In breast-feeding mothers, reduce insulin dose further once lactation is established.
Discuss contraception while the patient is still in hospital.
All women should be seen by the diabetes pregnancy care team six weeks after delivery.
More Information

Wednesday, 23 January 2008

Dr Tony Woolfson

Hi Lee,

Thanks for taking the trouble to reply and your offer of help.

Sorry not to get back to you sooner, but I've had a lot of replies around this, and I do a day job!

I have read your entire blog and was very moved by it. Not only do you have a bloody awful condition (the autonomic neuropathy is the pits), but you have courage not only to deal with it honestly but to share your emotions in public. I will certainly put a link to your blog on the site once it is up and running.

If I can ever be helpful to you as a resource to check things out, please feel free to contact me. Any time.

Any further thoughts you may have would be useful. I am also looking for an "advisory board" of some sort, who I can use to make sure I'm doing the best I can re site contact etc. Would you be interested?

Keep in touch - more in due course.

All good wishes,

Tony W

Dr Tony Woolfson MB BS DM MRCP(UK)www.tony.woolfson.net

Reply from a reader

Hiya mate,

Just thought I’d drop you a quick email.... you don’t me but I’ve just been reading your blog on Diabetes. I can’t say that I can completely understand how you feel about all of this but I can empathise a little.

Back in January 2005 I too was diagnosed with Type 1 at the age of 35.... I’ve always battled with my weight, drank far too much during my time in the RAF and was a heavy smoker.... so I blamed myself completely for it. Once I was under the control of the Consultant at Hospital though, he informed me that it was just a fluke.... these things happen blah blah....

Anyway, almost three later.... things are good.... It took me almost twelve months to feel ‘right’ again. I had the night time hypos, the feeling sh!t all the time.... I can understand how you feel Lee but be assured that it won’t last forever. Once you begin to bring it all under control and your body adjusts to the drugs (and it will take a while), life as a diabetic will get better.... I promise ya!

Anyway... take it easy and have a great Christmas

Best Wishes

Martin

glands


hi Fans!!!
well the stomach is still not right but i am trying different things and am making some progess, seeing my diabetic doc in feb, i need to ask about the glands in my cheeks, not sure if i mentioned it before but everytime i eat i getthis intense pain in the side on my mouth, a bit like when you have a pizzy cola bottle but x100!!, evertme i eat.. so niot nice so if anyone knows anything that may help let me know!!!!
hope you are all well

Saturday, 12 January 2008

Dads got type 2

Dad had been diagnised with type 2 diabetes today....... i had my suspicions he is a big guy always has been really but recently been very tired and not sleeping... he is seeing the diabetic nurse on monday i will let him learn as much as possible for himslef rather then dad if tried or do this... but if he needs me then he will ask